Jump to content


Photo

Movie Reviews


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 Eraserhead

Eraserhead

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts

Posted 01 August 2007 - 12:27 AM

Edit: This is now an index guiding everyone to all(most)of Nuneworld's movie reviews. You can submit your reviews here(I guess) or make a new topic and me, HaloD MC or Break The Reflection will index it on this for you.


Movie Review Links and URL's

EraserHead - Profile
-Brazil
-EraserHead
-Donnie Darko
-A Clockwork Orange

Harvey Two Face - Profile
-Goodfellas
-The Bunker

HaloD MC - Profile
-Alexander
-Nacho Lebre
-Doom: The Movie
-Grind

Yunie - Profile
-The Devils Rejects

BreakTheReflection - Profile
-A History of Violence

RonPrice - Profile
-The Passion of the Christ

Jessie - Profile
-The Incredibles



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brazil
Directed by Terry Gilliam
(1985)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Brazil is a sci-fi\drama\black comedy directed by Monty Python member Terry Gilliam. Written by Charles McKeown, Tom Stoppard, and Terry Gilliam himself. Starring Jonathan Pryce, and features Robert De Niro, Kim Greist, Michael Palin, Katherine Helmond, Bob Hoskins, and Ian Holm. Co-writer McKeown also has a small role.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Taking place in a dystopian future ran by bureaucrats. Brazil is about a man named Sam Lowry, a low level bureaucrat who, despite being conflicted about his role in an apparently overpowered bureaucracy, is actually happy with his job, but still complacent with everyday life. Sam escapes to a fantasy dreamland whenever he sleeps. In his dreams he is some sort of angelic warrior trying to save a woman trapped inside a floating cage. Its not long until his life goes crazy when his mother trys to get him a promotion, he meets a renegade heating engineer, and sees the woman he has literally been dreaming about.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The dream sequences are really something to behold, with effects that were amazing for their time and are still amazing even today. The first dream is neat, Sam has some cool metal wings, a shiny breastplate, a sword, and he's flying through the clouds and Sam sees the woman in the cage before he is awaken by the phone. Brazil has some amazing visuals and an equally as amazing story. The story is an incredibly deep one, there are many subplots(which confuses alot people, but didn't pose a problem for me) and an abrupt, but powerful plot twist at the end, and you really sympathize with the main character through his development throughout the movie. Brazil, like so many other great movies, is full of contradictions, its pessimistic yet whimsical, its serious yet funny, its dark yet romantic. It might be subjective, but I think Brazil is one of the greatest films of all time and I think it deserves to be praised as such. If you haven't seen it already, then see it as soon as possible, in fact stop reading this and go buy it! Needless to say I give this movie 10 out of 10.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
****************************************
****************************************
****************************************
****************************************
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inland Empire
Directed By David Lynch
(2006)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Intro:

Inland Empire (billed INLAND EMPIRE, in uppercase) is a 2006 surrealistic-experimental feature film, written and directed by David Lynch. It is his follow-up to 2001's Mulholland Drive, and shares many similarities with that film. It premiered in Italy at the Venice Film Festival on September 6, 2006. The feature took two and a half years to complete, and was shot entirely in digital video. The cast includes Lynch regulars such as Laura Dern, Justin Theroux, Harry Dean Stanton, Grace Zabriskie, as well as Jeremy Irons, Diane Ladd, and special appearances by Nastassja Kinski, William H. Macy, Laura Harring, Jordan Ladd and Ben Harper.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Plot:

The plot and film begins with a man and a woman with faces blurred beyond any recognition in a dimly lit room. They are speaking Polish. The man tells the woman to undress, which she is reluctant to do. He then asks her "do you know what a whore does?" to which she answers "yes, they !@#$", after this she undresses and the man climbs on top of her. She is presumably a prostitute. That scene fades out and we are then brought into a hotel room where there is a woman sitting at the end of the bed, facing the TV crying. On the TV there is a creepy sitcom where the all the actors are wearing bunny mask in a small badly lit room. The actors are speaking terse, seemingly meaningless, sentences, that are occasionally followed by an overdone laugh track. The female rabbit is talking about a secret that the male rabbit apparently knows. A knock at the door transpires, and the male rabbit goes to answer it, but the knocker is not revealed. The male rabbit walks out through the door and it closes behind him. We are then bought into another room, this time it's a well lit, lavish golden room where there are two more Polish guys. They juggle variations of the phrase "Do you understand?" between each other and other sentences of insofar, unknown worth. We are then brought to an old lady with huge cheek bones and bulging eyes(Grace Zabriskie) who is walking in a suburban neighborhood. She steps onto the porch of a high-class home and a butler answers. This is the home Nikki Grace (Laura Dern), and the old lady is let in, she then claims she is a new neighbor and that it is important for neighbors to know each other. She says to Nikki that she has heard she has a new part, Nikki tells her that she has only tried out for a new part, but the old lady says she was certain that she got the part. She then talks about a boy who opened a door and saw the end of a world, and a girl who was in an alley behind a marketplace and remembered something. Nikki is unsure what the woman is talking about. The woman ask Nikki if the movie was about murder. Nikki says no. The woman insists there is a "brutal !@#$ing murder" in her film. She continues by talking about mixing time saying, yesterdays, todays, and tomorrows; and remarks that she may think its after midnight when in fact it is 9:45. She then points to the couch across from her and says that tomorrow Nikki will be right there.

From here, the movie "starts", when Nikki and her friends, sitting on the aforementioned couch get the news that Nikki has gotten a part in the film...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Review:

In the movie Lynch used a digital camera, most movies use film. Lynch said that he used the digital camera to give him freedom. You can see much more movement in this film than his others, giving an almost voyeuristic feel. He also uses many close shots, and as always, obscure framing allowing ambiguity and confusion. Lynch really explores the freedom of movement and editing that is available with digital, and you can feel his energy and zest in the new medium. The moments of suspense and terror are so well done (there are several scenes that will literally make you jump) that I found a Hitcockian brilliance of using subtlety, indirectness, and sound to convey emotion rather than expensive special effects. Of course, there are other scenes that would qualify as downright freaky.

The movie is completely carried by Laura Dern, and not because she is in 90-95% of the scenes. Her character(s) morph and change so often in identity and time that it is hard to believe it is her in every role. Her range and ability to work consistently over so many years and under the conditions of this film is mind blowing. It is one of the finest performances I've seen by an actress or actor.

The film itself is hard to summarize. Most of you know the basic plot(if been reading this you should), but this really means nothing about the film. It has no type of linear story line and the converging and diverging plot lines are connected by only the most simple threads, time, location, memory ("Do I look familiar? Have you seen me before?") identity, and people who are good with animals. It would be a disservice to this film to try to find meaning or symbolism as I see some people already are. It is not a mystery to be solved, as Mulholland Dr. was (though that film never will be solved either). It is a movie that plays off of ideas, color, mood, it presents intangible emotions that we feel and internalize rather than think about and solve. Film doesn't need a solution to make sense, but it is typical for us to want solve things, to have closure. This film is better if you just let it wash over you and surrender the urge to find meaning.

The three hour running time makes no difference because the movie moves in and out of itself with no regard for time. Using so many scenes allows time to effect the viewer much as the characters themselves. As the characters question time and reality, the audience does too. As the scenes slowly build up, giving us reference, we start to wonder where we saw that character, who said that line before, what location fits into what part of the sequence and how, leading up to the Laura Dern quote I used before. It doesn't ask us to think, but to feel, and it does this better than any film I've seen. It plays on our emotions with intense sound and cinematography, grasping fragments from dreams, sliding in and out of reality, exploring nightmares, and asking us what time and reality really are. The film is also very self-conscious as I said before, and also makes many subtle (and not so) pokes at the audience. It also has some truly surreal moments of Lynch humor.

Explaining all this doesn't really matter because you will have to see it and take your own idea from it. I was skeptical going into this movie after what I had read, thinking Lynch had gone off the deep end. However, I realized nothing you read about it will make a difference once you see it, and that Lynch is in better form than ever. Ebert said that Mulholland Dr. was the one experiment where Lynch didn't break the test-tube. With INLAND EMPIRE he throws the lab equipment out the window. His freedom in making this movie, both with medium and artistic control, is unparalleled in anything he's done. He finally made a movie for himself and his vision, without any kind of apology or pretense.

Edited by Eraserhead, 17 September 2007 - 06:36 AM.


#2 BreakTheReflection

BreakTheReflection

    Sylvia Plath

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,979 posts

Posted 01 August 2007 - 07:14 PM

I like the review for Inland Empire, the way it's made reminds me of a poem.(t is a movie that plays off of ideas, color, mood, it presents intangible emotions that we feel and internalize rather than think about and solve.) I definitely want to see it.

#3 Harvey Two Face

Harvey Two Face

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 337 posts

Posted 02 August 2007 - 07:00 PM

Goodfellas
Goodfellas is a film about some 5 foot wise crack and his m8 Henry Hill. It mainly focuses on how child abuse affects us at a young age, and how that affects our life in the future. I thought robert de niro done a good performance. I thought joe pesci done a good performance. I thought ray liotta done a very good performance. I thought paul sorvino was quite fat. I would recommend goodfellas to anyone. This is because it was a good film. I also liked the camera shots used. Good. I would rate the film 9/10. This is because it was good. I would have given it 10/10 if it was very good.

#4 Eraserhead

Eraserhead

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts

Posted 02 August 2007 - 07:20 PM

Harvey, I don't think you understand the concept of this thread.

#5 Harvey Two Face

Harvey Two Face

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 337 posts

Posted 02 August 2007 - 08:02 PM

How comes? My english isn't a grade hope you know.

#6 Eraserhead

Eraserhead

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts

Posted 02 August 2007 - 08:11 PM

QUOTE(Harvey Two Face @ Aug 2 2007, 01:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How comes? My english isn't a grade hope you know.

It's not that, I named the topic Eraserhead's Movie Reviews, it's meant to be a place for my reviews. And it never really crossed my mind to make a topic for everyone's reviews is all.

#7 Mike!

Mike!

    Somebody save me

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,926 posts

Posted 02 August 2007 - 08:17 PM

Maybe it should cross your mind wink_smile.gif

I like your reviews.. but I don't know the films.

#8 Harvey Two Face

Harvey Two Face

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 337 posts

Posted 02 August 2007 - 08:17 PM

Oh, but i thought we were friends? sad.gif

#9 Eraserhead

Eraserhead

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts

Posted 02 August 2007 - 08:39 PM

QUOTE(Mike! @ Aug 2 2007, 01:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Maybe it should cross your mind ;)

Perhaps I can change the topic title and make this thread for everyone to submit reviews and such, what do you think?

QUOTE(Mike! @ Aug 2 2007, 01:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I like your reviews.. but I don't know the films.

I should get some more well known movies in, it would be good for people to tell whether they have similar tastes with me or not. But having less known movies reviewed is good too, not much point in always reading reviews for something you've already seen.

#10 Mike!

Mike!

    Somebody save me

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,926 posts

Posted 02 August 2007 - 09:18 PM

QUOTE(Eraserhead @ Aug 2 2007, 07:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Perhaps I can change the topic title and make this thread for everyone to submit reviews and such, what do you think?
I should get some more well known movies in, it would be good for people to tell whether they have similar tastes with me or not. But having less known movies reviewed is good too, not much point in always reading reviews for something you've already seen.

Yeah changing the title might be a good idea, would be good for the forum I think.

And you have a good point.

#11 Eraserhead

Eraserhead

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts

Posted 02 August 2007 - 09:26 PM

It has been done, now if it can be pinned that would be even better.

#12 Harvey Two Face

Harvey Two Face

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 337 posts

Posted 03 August 2007 - 07:32 PM

My Rob Schneider review:

Rob Schneider sucks. His jokes are immature, even when i was younger i thought his jokes were crap. He tries so hard to be funny, that he pulls out a possibly funny joke as an absolutely crap one. Thats a skill any !@#$ can pull off. He might have charisma, but that doesn't mean he is funny. It's the same with many people really. You think they have the potential to be funny, but instead they are just childish, pathetic, and boring. I haven't seen a schneider film in years, but i can remember all of them being predictable. For example: There's a banana lying on the floor, and then guess what, he walks on it and slips over. This is where it might actually make me smile, sicne the !@#$ might be dead, but instead, he manages to do like a 180 degree flip in the air and land in a star shape. Amazing how only the funny guy could do that isn't it. It's not funny, it's boring, predictable garbage. No wonder little !@#$%^&* children pay for this crap.


Should i even explain this picture. What a worthless, gay piece of $%^&*. "I wear seqguins over my nipples, i'm rob schneider, you know, the guy who is about 15th main character in home alone, i'm that big. Wait, home alone 2. I even got praised for being more of a tosser then macauley culkin. If you didn' know that, i've been nominated for razzie award for worst actor in some shitty kids film."

fag/10

Edited by HaloD MC, 14 August 2007 - 05:20 AM.


#13 Eraserhead

Eraserhead

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts

Posted 03 August 2007 - 11:36 PM

And now for the movie my screen name is stolen from and second review of a David Lynch film


----------------------------------------
Eraserhead
Directed by David Lynch
(1977)


Intro:
------------------------------------------
Eraserhead (released in France as The Labyrinth Man) is a 1977 surrealist-horror film written and directed by David Lynch. The film stars Jack Nance and Charlotte Stewart. Eraserhead initially polarized and baffled many critics and movie-goers, but over time the film has become a cult classic.

In 2004, the film was deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. Lynch has described his film as a "dream of dark and troubling things."

Considered as one of the most creative filmmakers of the modern era, American director David Lynch has developed a very peculiar and highly recognizable style through most of his work. A style where surreal images are overtly present, and linear plot lines are thrown away in order to focus mostly on the emotions created. This style has its roots in the fact that Lynch started his career as a painter, making his films an extension of that previous work, and very different to what is the classic definition of cinema. This background is probably the reason why he tends to move away from "normal" films (although movies like "The Elephant Man" and "The Straight Story" prove that he can make those kind of films too), and prefers to let his imagination run wild when making a movie. His first movie, "Eraserhead", is also probably the best example of Lynch's style of film-making.


Plot:
-------------------------------------------

"Eraserhead" is the story(?) of Henry Spencer (Jack Nance), a timid factory worker in a nightmarish industrial work that one night, during an uncomfortable dinner with the family of his girlfriend Mary X (Charlotte Stewart), receives the news that Mary had his baby. Henry agrees to marry Mary, as he truly feels that he loves her, but when Henry discovers that the baby is a mutant that cries all the time, life doesn't seem that easy anymore. Mary can not stand the screams of the child, so decides to leave Henry and return to her parent's home. Alone in his decayed apartment, Henry will have to live with the constant screaming of the deformed baby, facing his nightmares and fears about parenthood, as well as the temptations that live outside his room. And the only thing that can help him to survive is the idea that probably, in Heaven everything is fine.

Review:
-------------------------------------------------

Written by David Lynch, "Eraserhead" is a movie built with the logic of a dream, that is, without a linear plot and moving between a series of hallucinations and dream sequences that while apparently random, allow us to enter the twisted mind of its solitary main character. While ambiguous and cryptic, "Eraserhead" is an incredibly original character study about a man's fears about concepts such as fatherhood, compromise and responsibility. As written above, it follows the logic of a dream, but given it's dark nature, it would be more appropriate to say it is the vivid representation of a nightmare. Despite the apparent lack of narrative (or maybe because of it), we follow Henry closely, almost intimately, through his twisted, yet oddly very human, descent into madness as he is tormented by his demons embodied in the shape of the screaming mutant baby.

In "Eraserhead", David Lynch brings his nightmare come to life in a wonderfully horrific fashion thanks to his great imagination and his noticeable care for details. With an outstanding use of sound and the cinematography by Herbert Cardwell and Frederick Elmes, director David Lynch creates the perfectly haunting atmosphere of dread and decay that impregnates Henry's depressive industrial world, definitely symbolizing his bleak view of life. Many have said that "Eraserhead" is more a visual experience than a narrative, and I for once agree with that statement, as it is visually where we get the most clues about the film's obscure meanings, as Henry's vivid dreams and terrible hallucinations are opened windows to his troubled psyche. The pace is certainly slow, but it flows smoothly, allowing the film to express itself via the emotions of its images, like a beautiful yet frightening moving canvas.

As the disturbed Henry Spencer, Jack Nance is simply amazing, as if he had been born with the sole purpose of playing this role. What I mean is not that Nance is an extremely talent performer (honestly, that is not the case), but that he managed to convey exactly what Lynch wanted to do with his character in the most natural and believable way possible, effectively making Henry Spencer a honest portrayal of a man facing his most terrible fear: becoming a parent. The rest of the cast ranges from average to very good, with Charlotte Stewart being one of the latter, delivering a subtle performance as Mary X, Henry's girlfriend. In supporting roles, Allen Joseph and Jeanne Bates are good, but nothing spectacular, and the same could be said about Judith Anna Roberts, who plays the Beautiful Girl Across the Hall. Finally Laurel Near is great in the now iconic role of the Lady in the radiator.

While a powerful and wild exercise of imagination, "Eraserhead" is definitely not everyone's cup of tea, as due to the atypical way its constructed and the dark nature of its themes, it probably won't be easily accepted by those expecting a more linear, classic narrative style. However, a way to face "Eraserhead"'s cryptic plot is to let the images do the talking and simply experience the emotions Lynch's film attempts to convey. As written above, Lynch was a painter and performance artist before becoming a filmmaker, and "Eraserhead" carries a lot of this background in its conception; so the watching of the movie as a visceral experience, instead of intellectual, may be helpful in its enjoyment. A very personal movie for Lynch (a lot of the film's darkness comes from his own experiences in the different stages of his life), "Eraserhead" is like the pure expression of the director's troubles and fears on film.

Due to a constant lack of money, it took David Lynch 5 years to finish "Eraserhead", but one can truly say that the wait was worthy. Thanks to "Eraserhead", David Lynch would be noticed by Mel Brooks, who would help him to establish his name with "The Elephant Man". But even if Lynch's career had remained in the underground, "Eraserhead" is without a doubt, one of the most interesting and thought provoking films ever made.F

#14 BreakTheReflection

BreakTheReflection

    Sylvia Plath

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,979 posts

Posted 04 August 2007 - 02:39 AM

*pinned* 4.gif I like this topic so far...

#15 Eraserhead

Eraserhead

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts

Posted 09 August 2007 - 11:30 PM

Pinnenated, oh yeah!

Donnie Darko
Directed by Richard Kelly
(2001)

Intro:
----------------------------------
Donnie Darko is a drama/sci-fi/phycological film written and directed by Richard Kelly. Staring Jake Gyllenhaal and features Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jena Malone, Drew Barrymore, Patrick Swayze, Noah Wyle, Katharine Ross, Holmes Osborne, Daveigh Chase, Mary McDonnell, James Duval, Patience Cleveland, Beth Grant, Jolene Purdy, Gary Lundy and Stuart Stone and more.


Plot:
------------------------------
The story is set in the town of Middlesex, Virginia during the 1988 presidential election campaign. Donnie Darko(Jake Gyllenhaal) is an emotionally troubled teenager who sleepwalks and visits a therapist(Dr. Lilian Thurman, played by Katharine Ross) with whom he expresses his deepest emotions with. One night an unidentified jet engine falls in to Donnie's bedroom while he is out sleepwalking while following a voice in his head. The voice is that of Frank(James Duval), a six foot man in a bunny suit, who is a figment of Donnie's imagination. He tells Donnie the world will end and then goes on to say "28 days, 6 hours, 42 minutes and 12 seconds" the time when the world will presumably end. After this Franks tells Donnie to commit acts of crime for, insofar, unknown reasons.


Review:
-----------------------
In recent years, Hollywood has specialized in churning out mainstream trash; generic trash not even fit for the cutting room floor. Yet despite these movies' shortcomings, they continue to enjoy success at the box office. Sequel upon sequel, photo fit remake upon photo fit remake, frequently taking the box office by storm whilst simultaneously relegating smaller independent projects to the now relatively unheard-of arthouse cinemas. The tragedy is that the independent filmmakers are often those with the most talent; the most creativity; the most flair. One such filmmaker is director Richard Kelly, who saw the release of his scifi/drama/horror/tragedy/comedy/romance/thriller Donnie Darko last year. After reading a few rave reviews for the movie, I decided to check it out to find out what all the fuss was about.

Without giving too much away, I can safely say that Donnie Darko is a mind-blowing experience. And I use the word `experience' in its truest sense. From the opening shots of Donnie's suburban hometown, through to the satirical take on Middle American high schools, the movie is incredibly involving on many levels. In fact, each frame speaks to us on more profound terms than the majority of arthouse films would claim to do. This is, in part, due to the impeccable performances by each and every member of the cast. Jake Gyllenhaal delivers a subtle yet emotionally charged performance as Donnie himself - the scene in which he tells his psychologist of his various childhood traumas is made both funny and moving by the haunting way in which Jake delivers each line, contrasted with the almost childish qualities of his movements on the couch. Most incredible of all, however, is his terrifying screen presence as he trudges slowly through a deserted corridor or along a dark street, head tilted slightly forward, face fixed in a confused, bewildered expression. Drew Barrymore is also superb as the liberal high school teacher rejected and scorned in a Conservative education system, while Patrick Swayze is excellent in his extended cameo, a smartly observed satire of a self-help guru with a few skeletons in the closet.

Where the movie comes into its own, however, is in its ability to incorporate and deal with a variety of genres. Every movie genre seems to make an appearance, so much so that to categorize the movie as simply a `psychological horror' or a `supernatural thriller' would be an unforgivable insult. Even the movie's portrayal of a high school, whilst unique and original, even bears a slight resemblance to the teen movies of yesteryear, what with school bullies, the new kid in town and an annoying gym teacher. Yet, Kelly never lets his movie sink to the depths of clichéd teen drama. Instead, he paints a startlingly realistic portrait of suburban America, interspersed with flashes of sci-fi surreality. The movie never descends into total weirdness, yet nothing ever seems quite real.

Donnie Darko may conjure up images of oversized bunnies and watery projections protruding from people's midriffs, yet on an emotional level it is very much human. Donnie Darko is as much a drama as it is a thriller, and a superb character study at that. We are often led to question whether Donnie's visions and actions are the consequence of a paranoid, twisted, or drug-polluted mind, or whether he really is experiencing such things. His gradual disillusionment as he realizes that there is no hope and that he may have to go through eternity alone is beautifully portrayed, while the sense of peace and inner fulfillment he ultimately achieves is a truly inspirational message.

I implore you to watch this movie. It most certainly is not for everyone, and will probably be cast off by a lot of the movie going public as pretentious, artsy nonsense. Donnie Darko only saw a very short, unsuccessful US run and was accompanied with very little hype. Hilarious, heart-rendingly sad, terrifying, profound, intellectually stimulating, emotionally absorbing and thematically relevant, this is by far the best movie of 2001.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users